• Donald V. Watkins

The Royal Bloodline of Jesus and Mary Magdalene

By: Donald V. Watkins

© Copyrighted and Published on January 3, 2020


The Bible, as we know it today, is a selection of works known as the "Gospels." None of the Gospels in the New Testament was written during Jesus' lifetime. All of them are based upon second and third-hand hearsay.


Collectively, the Gospels represent man's view of God's word and Jesus' teachings, as liberally censored, edited, revised, glossed, and rewritten by human hands at different periods in history.


The Bible is the most famous and revered history book in the world. However, it reflects the theological views and personal biases of the man who complied it, as well as the men who ratified it. The revisions to the Bible over time reflect the theological narratives within various sects of Christianity.


The Bible could well include far more books and writings than it actually does. The missing books were deliberately excluded by the men who compiled, ratified, and revised the original version of the Bible.


In A.D. 367, Bishop Athanasius of Alexandria compiled a list of works to be included in the New Testaments. His list was ratified by the all-male Church Council of Hippo in A.D. 393 and again by the all-male Council of Carthage four years later.


These conclaves of clerics decided on a fairly arbitrary basis what books belonged in the Bible and what books did not. Since then, the Bible has been subjected to fairly drastic editing, censorship, and revisions. Some very important and historically credible books were simply suppressed because they did not conform to Bishop Athanasius' theological views and those of the ratifying conclaves. The books in the Bible conformed to the needs of certain vested religious interests that had an important stake in the matter.


The Gospels of Mark, Luke, Matthew, and John Present the Life of Jesus


Modern scholars are unanimous in agreeing that the Gospels in the New Testament do not date from Jesus' time. The Gospel of Mark was composed between A.D. 66 and 74. The Gospel of Luke was composed around A.D. 80. The Gospel of Matthew was composed around A.D. 85, and was written by someone other than the disciple named Matthew.


The Gospel of John was composed around A.D. 100 by an unknown author. It is deemed by Biblical scholars to be the most reliable book in the New Testament even though it, like the others, has been subject to doctoring, editing, expurgation, and revision.


These four Gospels present the life of Jesus from his birth to his crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension.


The New Testament, as it exists today, is essentially a product of fourth-century editors and writers -- custodians of Roman Catholic orthodoxy and "adherence to message," with the Church's vested interests protected.


The Marriage of Jesus and Mary Magdalene


After I published "Mary Magdalene: Was She Jesus' Wife?" on November 10, 2019, some readers impulsively dismissed the fact of this marriage because it is not expressly stated in the Bible. In addition to the many Biblical references discussed in my article, there are ample historical and credible books, scrolls, and Biblical texts (a) documenting the marriage of Jesus and Mary Magdalene and (b) explaining why explicit references to the marriage were excised from the Bible when it was compiled in A.D. 367.


There is no explicit statement in Bishop Athanasius' version of the Bible that Jesus was or was not married. Many of the disciples were, in fact, married. Unlike Catholic priests, Jesus did not preach celibacy, and there is no evidence that he practiced it. In fact, Matthew 19:4-5 suggests that Jesus favored marriage.


According to the Judaic custom during his time, it was mandatory that an adult Jewish man be married. Celibacy was vigorously condemned. It would have been considered freakish for Jesus to be unmarried and celibate at the time.


Jesus' rabbinical training and acknowledged Rabbi status in the Jewish community made it certain that he was married. Jewish Mishnaic law commanded it.


The Gospel of John describes the wedding at Cana, which was attended by Jesus and his mother. John 2:3-10. Jesus performed the duties at this wedding that are ascribed to the "bridegroom" under Jewish law. The wedding was attended by hundreds of wealthy and influential people like Joseph of Arimathea. Jesus transmuted water into wine at the request of his mother. This was his first public miracle.


The Book of Revelations, at 19: 7-9 and 21:9, attests to the marriage of the "Lamb" and his "wife." Revelations describes Jesus as the "Lamb." Revelations 19:9 says, "Come hither, I will show thee the bride, the Lamb's wife." Revelations 21:14 describes Jesus' twelves disciples as the "twelve apostles of the Lamb."


According to the Nag Hammadi scrolls -- a collection of Gnostic Biblical texts from about A.D. 150 that were excluded from the Bible -- Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene. The male disciples, particularly Peter, resented her spousal influence on Jesus.


The Nag Hammadi scrolls, some of which predate the Gospels in the New Testament, rest upon first-hand knowledge and/or eyewitness sources -- oral accounts by Jews fleeing the Holy Land. They escaped censorship and revisions of later Roman Catholic orthodoxy. They were written for an Egyptian audience, not a Romanized audience.


The Gospel of Philip describes three women who were always with Jesus -- His mother, his mother's sister, and Mary Magdalene, who Jesus called his "companion." In Jesus' era, the word "companion" was translated as "spouse."


"Christ loved her more than all the disciples and used to kiss her often on the mouth," according to the Gospel of Philip. Near the end of this Gospel appears this statement: " There is the Son of man and there is the son of the Son of man. The Lord is the Son of man, and the son of the Son of man is he who is created through the Son of man."


On the basis of the New Testament references cited in my previous article (e.g., Luke 23:28-29) and the Nag Hammadi scrolls, there is strong and credible evidence of a hereditary bloodline that descended directly from Jesus and Mary Magdalene -- the birth of a "son of the Son of man."


The Royal Bloodline is Well-Documented in European History


Jesus is a lineal descendant of a royal bloodline. The Book of Matthew 1:1-17 describes Jesus' bloodline, which spans 42 generations. Jesus' bloodline includes King Solomon and King David.


Jesus experienced marriage and produced offspring with Mary Magdalene. He was not a celibate and unmarried man, as portrayed in the Roman Catholic orthodoxy or King James' version of the Bible.


After Jesus' crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension, Mary Magdalene, along with at least one of Jesus' children, was smuggled out of Jerusalem and into Gaul in the southern part of France where there was an established Jewish community already existing.


Inexplicably, there is no further reference to Mary Magdalene in Biblical history after the ascension of Christ.


Respected historians and scholars in Europe have documented the fact that the Jesus-Mary Magdalene Royal Bloodline perpetuated itself, intact and incognito, in Europe for the next four hundred years. During the fifth century A.D., this bloodline intermarried with the Royal Bloodline of the Franks, thus engendering the Merovingian dynasty. Despite all efforts to eradicate it, the Jesus-Mary Magdalene Royal Bloodline -- the Merovingian bloodline -- survived.


As an example of the Catholic Church's tacit recognition of the power and influence of the Jesus-Mary Magdalene Royal Bloodline, the Church installed and openly displayed Michelangelo's Pieta in St. Peter's Cathedral, Vatican City. This statue portrays Jesus lifeless body in the arms of his loving wife, Mary Magdalene, after his crucifixion.


Finally, there are at least a dozen families in Europe today -- with numerous collateral branches -- who are of direct Merovingian lineage and who are members of the Jesus-Mary Magdalene Royal Bloodline. The names and history of these families will be the subject of an upcoming article.


[Author's Note: An excellent history of the Royal Bloodline of Jesus and Mary Magdalene is presented in "Holy Blood, Holy Grail" by Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh and Henry Lincoln, published in Great Britain by Jonathan Cape Ltd., 1982. This well-researched, New York Times bestseller served as one of my reference sources for the many verified historical and Biblical facts evidencing the Jesus-Mary Magdalene marriage and Royal Bloodline. As Americans have seen in history books about the birth of this nation, historians tend to present narratives that reflect the cultural norms and biases existing in the periods of history that is presented. For example, the demeaning and degrading treatment of Native Americans ("Indian Savages", "Redskins") and African-Americans ("Niggers", "Coons", "Savage Beasts", etc.) in early American history books represents a classic example of recorded history that incorporates the personal biases and social norms of the writers of that period. Women have suffered a similar fate in recorded history around the world during times of extreme male dominance. The Bible, as we know it, is no different in its biased treatment of Mary Magdalene and other prominent women.]


PHOTO: Mary Magdalene with Jesus

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© 2020 by Donald V. Watkins, P.C.